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Why Student Led Conferences?

This year, the Lower School, and most recently the High School faculty and students, worked together to hold Student Led Conferences. Successful student-led conferences require changes in the role that teacher, student and parent have played in traditional parent conferencing. Teachers become facilitators, students become leaders and parents become active listeners and questioners.

Having students lead a conference with parents is a way to maximize student involvement as it promotes three elements essential to improving student performance in school: Relevance; why we are teaching what we are teaching to students: Responsibility; making the students more responsible for learning and: Reporting; engaging parents into the stream of student progress in learning.

It is now widely accepted by policy makers and educators that when parents are involved in their children’s education, children are more likely to succeed in school. Parent have great influence on school success by giving attention to their children’s needs and interests. The greatest influence on learning is not simply the methods used, but the ability to motivate a love of learning. What I enjoyed most about the Student Led Conferences was my engagement with the students and the quality of interactions between students, parents and teachers.

– Rubeena Sandhu, Director of Education

Grade 12 projects: a culmination of a journey.

By their senior year, Whistler Waldorf Grade 12 students are practiced at relating to multiple points of view simultaneously in order to create an integrated picture of the world and their place in it. Our students’ final year is a time for them to synthesize and bring everything together—reflected in their capstone senior project. It’s from this solid place of self-knowing that they discover and pursue their purpose in a world that desperately needs their creative and innovative thinking.

Each year our high school seniors do independent research and year-long projects in areas that uniquely intrigue each one of them, from social justice to activism, to exploring the deeper roots of the human psyche to building motorcycles and more.  These capstone projects strengthen skills of independent thought and study that last a lifetime.

If you’ve ever wondered what the “end result” of a full Waldorf education is, this is a great opportunity to see it, and share it with your friends and family.

– Rubeena Sandhu, Director of Education