Tag Archive for: education

Elementary & HS Teacher Asst. required

Whistler Waldorf is currently recruiting for full-time or part time Teacher Assistants to work under a teacher’s supervision to give students additional attention and instruction.

Duties expected:

Teacher assistants typically do the following:

  • Reinforce lessons presented by teachers by reviewing material with students one-on-one or in small groups
  • Enforce school and class rules to help teach students proper behavior
  • Help teachers with record keeping, such as tracking attendance and calculating grades
  • Help teachers prepare for lessons by getting materials ready or setting up equipment, such as computers
  • Help supervise students in class, between classes, during lunch and recess, and on field trips

 Qualifications requested: 

  • Completion of Grade 12
  • A recognized Post-Secondary Special Education Assistant Certificate or the ability to qualify for one.
  • Preference given to a Degree/Diploma in a related field, and/or extensive experience in an equivalent field.
  • Excellent communication skills in English, both oral and written
  • Any experience using techniques of Applied Behavior Analysis, Non-Violent Crisis Intervention training (e.g., CPI or MANDT), Completion of POPARD coursework, the ability to speak a second language and a Workplace First Aid Certificate are considered to be an asset.

Whistler Waldorf School offers a flexible working environment and competitive salary based on relevant education and work experience. For full-time positions, we provide a thorough compensation package including health benefits and insurance, pension, professional development and partial tuition remission for children attending the school.

Please submit your cover letter and resume to principal@whistlerwaldorf.com

Application deadline: Applications accepted until positions are filled.

We thank all applicants for their interest. Only those selected for an interview will be contacted.

The Three Fundamental Forces in Education: Balance in Teaching

Dear Parents and Guardians,

100 years ago, society and education had moved towards a more differentiated system, separating sciences from the arts, the arts from morality, and athletics from academics. Today, finally, educational systems all over the world are “catching up” to Steiner’s observations that separating these fundamental spheres of activity for children could be detrimental to their healthy development, and in fact, advocated that it is in their union that learning becomes an art, and education becomes a vital healing force in a young person’s life.

Rudolf Steiner mentored teachers, and called teachers to task, ensuring that their teaching incorporated a balance and integration of the arts, and sciences. This was, and still is, a fundamental basis for Waldorf Schools.

100 years ago Rudolf Steiner emphasized that the Waldorf approach was a great deal more than simply the application of a teaching method. His new art of education was born out of a knowledge of the growing child as a holistic being – embodying body, soul, and spirit.

This year is the 100th anniversary of Waldorf Education and we believe that one hundred years is only the beginning. In celebration, we will be highlighting the breadth of our curriculum over the course of the year and warmly invite you to join!

Rubeena Sandhu, Head of School

Changing seasons; Back to School rhythms

The return of the school year brings us all together again while the summer days are coming to a close.  As the sun rays diminish we now begin to turn inward, and can be excited and challenged to turn also, to the fiery warmth of our school community in the fall.  The turning of the leaves are a beautiful vision, yet can be a symbol of a cyclic transitions within a familiar environment: the returning rhythms of school, the bustle of after school programs, homework and packed lunches, the complexity of old relationships and the challenges of new ones.

As the leaves turn, let us honour our students, our children, our colleagues and ourselves. As we adjust to the changing season, let us turn to each other as partners, and enjoy each other in another school year of growth and development for all.

Rubeena Sandhu, Head of School

We still have spaces for K, Gr. 1-3

We are currently accepting applications for the 2019-20 school year for KindergartenGrade 1-4, 8 and High School Grade 11 & 12

“I invite you to learn more about our unique educational approach. With small class sizes and an emphasis on strong student/teacher relationships, Whistler Waldorf fosters the development of creative thinking, self-confidence and an enthusiasm for academic learning.” 

Ms. Rubeena Sandhu – Director of Education

Offering an extensive tuition adjustment for qualified families. Learn more here.

Email Admissions to book a personal tour or find out more about our admissions process.

Early Childhood Appreciation Day

Today, we celebrate Early Childhood Educator Appreciation Day, a day where we recognize the commitment, hard work and passion of our early childhood educators in BC. To witness young students get excited about going to school is remarkable, and it is because of the positive relationships and inclusive environment that our early childhood educators create in and outside the classroom.

Our students are fortunate to have dedicated staff contribute daily to their overall development and well-being. Through play-based and child-centered teachings, our early childhood educators bring age-appropriate programming that promotes each child’s physical, cognitive, language, emotional, social and creative development.

I would like to thank all of our early childhood educators for teaching and nurturing our early learners in the critical development states of life, for preparing our students for life-long learning and emotional well-being, and for creating a space where each student can experience a sense of belonging.

– Rubeena Sandhu, Director of Education

Experiential Learning in Waldorf Schools 

Students at Whistler Waldorf School participate in a wide range of experiential learning activities. Experiential learning in a general sense, is the process of learning through experienceIt is important to note however, that experiential learning in Waldorf Schools is not limited to creating projects or visiting a farm. If any of you have ever been moved by a compelling story, an eloquent song or a powerful play, you will understand the power of imagination for enhancing learning connections, and as an “experience” in its own right. 

Waldorf schools intentionally incorporate a broad and balanced range of imaginative, creative, and kinesthetic experiences within the academic program. Yes, even content like coding can be taught imaginatively. At the same time Waldorf teachers maintain a keen awareness of lesson’s meaning and relevance for a student’s senses, feelings and cognition so that they are actively engaged at each stage of their development.  As Henry Barnes, a long time Waldorf teacher once wrote, “When children relate what they learn to their own experience, they are interested and alive, and what they learn becomes their own. Waldorf schools are designed to foster this kind of learning.” 

– Rubeena Sandhu, Director of Education  

Grade 12 projects: a culmination of a journey.

By their senior year, Whistler Waldorf Grade 12 students are practiced at relating to multiple points of view simultaneously in order to create an integrated picture of the world and their place in it. Our students’ final year is a time for them to synthesize and bring everything together—reflected in their capstone senior project. It’s from this solid place of self-knowing that they discover and pursue their purpose in a world that desperately needs their creative and innovative thinking.

Each year our high school seniors do independent research and year-long projects in areas that uniquely intrigue each one of them, from social justice to activism, to exploring the deeper roots of the human psyche to building motorcycles and more.  These capstone projects strengthen skills of independent thought and study that last a lifetime.

If you’ve ever wondered what the “end result” of a full Waldorf education is, this is a great opportunity to see it, and share it with your friends and family.

– Rubeena Sandhu, Director of Education

Building a ‘community school’ with events to connect

What does a healthy, successful school look like? 

What’s the most accurate predictor of academic achievement? It’s not socioeconomic status, nor how prestigious the school is that a child attends. One of the best predictors of student success is the extent to which parents and teachers engage.  The measure of a healthy school depends on the quality of relationships–chiefly the relationships among students, teachers, and parents.

Teachers who connect with parents about their children’s education often see a profound change in their classrooms. Engaged parents tend to think highly of teachers, which improves teacher and student morale. Knowing more about a student’s family life helps teachers prepare and deliver lessons that better fit students’ needs.

That’s why Whistler Waldorf holds three class parent evenings each year, and events such as “Mom and Dad Nights”. Not only do these evenings focus on student life; they focus on connection and learning more about each other as we explore the principles of learning that live within our school.

I look forward to learning and laughing together at tonight’s Mom’s Night!

– Rubeena Sandhu, Director of Education